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Services & Facilities

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous glucose monitoring automatically tracks blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, throughout the day and night. You can see your glucose level anytime at a glance. You can also review how your glucose changes over a few hours or days to see trends. Seeing glucose levels in real time can help you make more informed decisions throughout the day about how to balance your food, physical activity, and medicines.

  • How does a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) work?

    A CGM works through a tiny sensor inserted under your skin, usually on your belly or arm. The sensor measures your interstitial glucose level, which is the glucose found in the fluid between the cells. The sensor tests glucose every few minutes. A transmitter wirelessly sends the information to a monitor.

    The monitor may be part of an insulin pump or a separate device, which you might carry in a pocket or purse. Some CGMs send information directly to a smartphone or tablet. Several models are available and are listed in the American Diabetes Association’s product guide .

  • Special Features of a CGM

    CGMs are always on and recording glucose levels—whether you’re showering, working, exercising, or sleeping. Many CGMs have special features that work with information from your glucose readings:

    • An alarm can sound when your glucose level goes too low or too high.
    • You can note your meals, physical activity, and medicines in a CGM device, too, alongside your glucose levels.
    • You can download data to a computer or smart device to more easily see your glucose trends.

    Some models can send information right away to a second person’s smartphone—perhaps a parent, partner, or caregiver. For example, if a child’s glucose drops dangerously low overnight, the CGM could be set to wake a parent in the next room.

    Currently, one CGM model is approved for treatment decisions, the Dexcom G5 Mobile. That means you can make changes to your diabetes care plan based on CGM results alone. With other models, you must first confirm a CGM reading with a finger-stick blood glucose test before you take insulin or treat hypoglycemia.

  • Special Requirements Needed to Use a CGM

    Twice a day, you may need to check the CGM itself. You’ll test a drop of blood on a standard glucose meter. The glucose reading should be similar on both devices.

    You’ll also need to replace the CGM sensor every 3 to 7 days, depending on the model.

    For safety it’s important to take action when a CGM alarm sounds about high or low blood glucose. You should follow your treatment plan to bring your glucose into the target range, or get help.

  • What are the benefits of a CGM?

    Compared with a standard blood glucose meter, using a CGM system can help you

    • better manage your glucose levels every day
    • have fewer low blood glucose emergencies
    • need fewer finger sticks

    A graphic on the CGM screen shows whether your glucose is rising or dropping—and how quickly—so you can choose the best way to reach your target glucose level.

    Over time, good management of glucose greatly helps people with diabetes stay healthy and prevent complications of the disease. People who gain the largest benefit from a CGM are those who use it every day or nearly every day.

  • What are the limits of a CGM?

    Researchers are working to make CGMs more accurate and easier to use. But you still need a finger-stick glucose test twice a day to check the accuracy of your CGM against a standard blood glucose meter.

    With most CGM models, you can’t yet rely on the CGM alone to make treatment decisions. For example, before changing your insulin dose, you must first confirm a CGM reading by doing a finger-stick glucose test.

    A CGM system is more expensive than using a standard glucose meter. Check with your health insurance plan or Medicare to see whether the costs will be covered.